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interview 2012 philip chryssikos

Philip Chryssikos interview (2012)
#1


  1. First of all can you tell us a bit about yourself?
    I'm Managing Editor of Entertainment News, a division of UBC Media, with a team of multi media journalists who provide rolling showbiz news and videos to more than 140 commercial radio stations around the UK and other online clients. 
    Over the years I've won awards for my work, including gold at the European Radio Awards, as well as being a finalist at the prestigious Sony Radio Academy Awards.
    My career has taken me across the radio industry, most notable as a news presenter on London's 95.8 Capital FM and Capital Gold for 10 years, as well as a DJ on Capital FM London. Running parallel to this, and which I still do, is voice commercials, front many corporate presentations and can be heard as the 'voice' of many on-hold telephone systems.


  2. You're a journalist as well as a voice over artist, how well do these two fields integrate?

    On paper these two areas, journalist and voice over artist, are poles apart - however as a radio journalist it does give me a greater understanding of writing scripts and voicing them too. When I receive a script to record it helps me greatly to understand what the client is trying to convey through the use of the words in the script and the style they want to achieve - coupled with the brief they have given me.


  3. Can you think of any advice for someone looking for a career in the media ( specifically voice over)?

    Media is a 'can do' industry - you'll find many people who can't be bothered to start on the bottom of the ladder and prove themselves as they progress. With this, it leaves the door wide open for those who can be bothered and get stuck in! Be persistent - but don't follow any job or role in media. Know what you want to do and get involved in some way, in that area.
    Never give up, be polite, engaging, willing and work your socks off. It'll pay off eventually, if not financially then through job satisfaction!

    b) If someone is looking to take any training or courses in voice over how would you recommend they go about picking a course?

    The biggest piece of advice for someone looking for a career as a voice over is know your voice! It sounds either obvious or silly - but it's the third one, it's true! Know your voice's strengths and weaknesses. Know its high and low capabilities - just like a singer. If you know all its parameters, then you can manipulate your vocal range to achieve the tone, texture and pace of a script you are reading. 
    Always listen to other people's voices in commercials, narration, on-hold messages, etc, and listen to how these voice artists achieve what you hear. Try it yourself - not necessarily in a studio, but for fun as you're going about your day when you're alone. Think of what they are saying, how they are saying it. Sure, in post-production a voice can be slowed down or sped up (for example in the terms and conditions part at the end of a commercial,) but just practice! 


  4. Do you have any particular warm ups you use before you record?

    Yes - talk very low before you go in to the studio! Silly low, as low as you can go - and high, stupidly high - as high as you can speak, and then everything in between. It's all about loosening your vocal chords.
    Have water with you in the studio - my top tip is hot, not boiling, water and drink this before and in between takes. Never drink coffee, tea, or soft drinks - these build up excess saliva in the mouth, not good if you're about to do a read or a long session. Likewise, never eat before you go in the studio or have a meal before hand. If you don't believe me - go against my tip and you'll see how it is when you try to voice a script!


  5. Can you tell us a bit about your recording set up?

    I haven't a home voice studio of my own, however I do all my editing and audio production at home before sending a voice session back to the client. I ensure I take out any mistakes and send off the finished article.
    I'm fortunate to work in an environment where I have access to one of six self-op voice studios. Should I be out of the office on a particular day, I'm just a 5 mile drive to a studio - this suits me perfectly and has done for almost 20 years now.


    [Image: Philip%202_0.jpg]


  6. Do you have any advice on recording demo reels? When should an aspiring voice over artist think of recording their first one and what should it contain?

    A voice reel should be no more than 2 minutes in duration overall and contain a variety of different voice styles. Now with everything being online, an overall demo isn't required. Instead you should use individual demos, one per style, to showcase your range of styles.
    When is the right time? You'll know - just remember practice makes perfect and always get a copy of anything you voice so you can self critique yourself.


  7. Do you have any final advice you wish to share? Or projects you're working on that you'd like to let us know about?

    Aside from running Entertainment News ([/url]www.EntertainmentNews.co.ukWink, presenting music shows on Time 106.6 ([url=http://web.archive.org/web/20140626021255/http://www.Time1066.com/]www.Time1066.comWink and voicing various projects, I also help coach and produce up and coming voice over artists and their demos. Every person is a fresh challenge, which I enjoy. And in between all of that I'm about to start work on my own website to show case my own work and coaching and consultancy services. In the meantime you can get in touch by following me on Twitter, @PChryssikos.
 
We want to thank Philip for his time, be sure to check out his twitter account!

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