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editing noise out

Editing Out Noise
#1
How hard is it to edit out unwanted voice, when recording a voice over? Is there any special software I can use to remove such unwanted sounds from my recording?
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#2
(03-13-2016, 11:02 PM)Jonzz Wrote: How hard is it to edit out unwanted voice, when recording a voice over? Is there any special software I can use to remove such unwanted sounds from my recording?

there's already a tutorial up azure posted from the old site noise reduction does wonders, you may also want to look a gating.

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#3
What does gating mean exactly? Sorry for sounding like a total newbie, but I`m just really learning all there is to know about voice acting and doing quality voice over work.
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#4
(03-13-2016, 11:27 PM)Sandy Wrote: What does gating mean exactly? Sorry for sounding like a total newbie, but I`m just really learning all there is to know about voice acting and doing quality voice over work.

Gating:
http://www.behindthemixer.com/audio-gating-guide/
The idea is to mute the sound entirely when the volume falls below a certain threshold. I doubt that with voice recording there are many circumstances where it will give you very good results, though.
You can do it manually, of course -- muting the pauses between your words, one by one, where background noise is heard -- but this will not help with sounds that are heard over your voice.

Audacity's noise reduction works amazingly well, but can only deal with steady uniform sounds -- white noise from the mic's electronic circuitry, hum from the AC power line, or even ambient sounds like the fan of your computer, if it runs on a constant speed. It will not help you with traffic noise, or barking neighborhood dogs, etc.

To reduce ambient noise, you have to get the mic closer to your mouth. Volume decreases with the square of the distance, so, if your mic is one inch from your mouth instead of 10 inches, this (at least in theory) increases the volume of your voice by a factor of 100, or 20dB -- meaning, you can turn the recording volume down by 20dB, thus reducing ambient noise by these 20dB, which makes a lot of difference.

We see singers on stage almost touch their mics with their lips, but, of course, they know their texts by heart -- you won't see this in a recording studio, and when you are reading your text, having a mic (and its pop filter) immediately in front of your nose will hardly be comfortable. I have no experience with this, but I suppose a headworn microphone might be a good solution, like, for instance, this one:
https://www.amazon.com/Shure-WH20XLR-Dyn...0001DBZNM/
(This particular mic is a dynamic one, therefore doesn't need power supply, and there is a version with a 3.5mm connector that plugs into almost anything that can record sounds. Since, different from USB mics, A/D conversion is done by the recording device, sound quality depends on the quality of that hardware. A dedicated sound recorder, or even a good phone, will probably give you better results than most desktop computers.)

Alternatively there are many USB headsets available for little money, which also put the mic close to your mouth, but their cheap mics will usually give you poor sound quality -- still, probably worth trying out, if you have one ready or can return it after you've tested it.
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#5
It's not the most professional of ways, but audacity does a great job if you just want a simple clean of audio.

Step 1
Make sure you have a a bit of the recording where there is no talking just what is happening in the background.

Step 2
Record your audio as usual.

Step 3
Highlight the "dead-air".

Step 4
Go to Effect > Noise Reduction

Step 5
Click Get Noise Profile

Step 6
Highlight the ENTIRE recording

Step 7
Go to Effect > Noise Reduction. This will depend on the level of the noise and you microphone quality so you will need to adjust the settings to your situation. Then Hit Ok. This will take the a bit of trial and error until you get that "Sweet Spot". Once you have it to your liking hit okay.

DONE!

Like I said this will take some trial and errors to get it just right but once you have it done once you will know the settings you need for next time.
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